OnLive to stream Steam games for $14.99 a month.

Posted on Mar 6 2014 - 9:42pm by Jared Gooch

OnLive is the cloud based gaming company that has had a rough start and about a year ago was purchased from Steve Perlman by Gary Lauder. The company has been trying to stream line to a widely usable game distribution model. Instead of competing with Steam they have begun to integrate their services with Steam.

Onlive

For $14.99 a month, subscribers of OnLive services will be able to play a limited number of the Steam games they own with the cloud service. More and more companies are signing on with OnLive, such as Warner Brothers who own the Batman and LEGO franchises.

More companies will be willing to sign up because OnLive games won’t need extra coding to play over their cloud gaming network. Publishers used to have to sell their games through an Onlive storefront that required OnLive’s own coding process. After integrating with the Steam servers, publishers just have to allow Onlive permission to stream their games.

The pay model gets complicated, all their old compliment of 250 games are accessible for $9.99 a month without having to purchase single games. OnLive Go will be their MMO streaming service, which will require a large initial download in an effort to allow players to play instantly without having to complete a total download. The first game, Second Life, will be playable on a tablet, PC, or TV for a large chunk of $3 an hour.

The new HTML5 interface has been reported as sluggish by The Verge. OnLive is opening new datacenters in Seattle and Chicago with a new Management Team. Maybe with Steam integration Onlive will make headway in it’s cloud gaming ventures.

  • Justin Curtright

    This technology is just not going to happen with American ISPs. Sooner people realize that, the sooner we can move on.

    • http://gizmofusion.com/ Bryan

      Not sure I follow. OnLive has proven successful in the US already. They are just changing their business model to not compete with Steam anymore.

      • Justin Curtright

        If you actually think OnLive was successful, then I really don’t know what to tell you. By just about any metric, it was a massive failure. Especially when a company has to “restructure” after firing half their employees. http://goo.gl/9iDLby

        But hey, I’m sure you and the other four people that use it are having a blast.